Katavi National Park is situated in the south-west of Tanzania, not far from Lake Tanganiyka, but very far from all other touristic destinations, or even small towns. With its 4470 sqkm, it is the third biggest national park of Tanzania, and the least visited (one talks about a few hundreds a year!). It belongs to a bigger ecosystem encompassing Rukwa National Park to the south (hunting reserve).

Katavi National Park is set on a shallow easterly extension of the Rift, which builds vast plains. The Katuma and Kapapa rivers cross its territory and build up two seasonnal lakes, Lake Katavi and Lake Chada. During rainy season the rivers flood the plains to form huge swamps. In dry season, the rivers shrink, and a few water-holes remain in the plains, attracting a large number of animals.

Katavi National Park is set on a shallow easterly extension of the Rift, which builds vast plains. The Katuma and Kapapa rivers cross its territory and build up two seasonnal lakes, Lake Katavi and Lake Chada. During rainy season the rivers flood the plains to form huge swamps. In dry season, the rivers shrink, and a few water-holes remain in the plains, attracting a large number of animals.

Mammals:

Here you will see big herds of elephants, prides of lions, leopards and hyenas, . The grassland plain supports large mammals as giraffes, waterbucks, roan antelope, eland, black legged topi and thousands of buffalos. Katavi boasts the highest concentration of both, hippo and crocodile in Tanzania.

Birds:

More then 400 bird species have been recorded, among them a substantial number of water birds such as pelican, black-browed albatross, crested lark, green sand pipper and African snipe

When and how to visit?

The best season to visit Katavi National Park is from July to November, during the dry season, when all animals gather around the little available water. The best way to reach this remote park is by plane, and it combines well with the southern parks, Selous and Ruaha, or the western parks, Mahale and Gombe.